REGION VI (WESTERN VISAYAS) > Capiz

Brief Description
The Province of Capiz is known as the Seafood Capital of the Philippines.

Discover the Capiz mystic. Explore the rolling hills, mountain peaks and ranges. Enjoy daytime excursions at the province’s wide beaches and isolated coves. Have a fill of a variety of seafoods available all year round. Visit local gardens, historical sites, old Spanish churches, Southeast Asia’s largest bell at Pan-ay Church, and the birthplace of Manuel A. Roxas (first Philippine President).

Experience local festivals like Balintawakan and Sinadya sa Halaran. Go spelunking. A lot of caves are waiting to be explored. Or you can make special arrangements to witness the Mundo tribe dance in Tapaz.

Accommodations in cottages, hotels, and resorts are available in Roxas City and other municipalities outside the city.
 
Geography
The Province of Capiz occupies a land area of 2,633 square kilometers, representing 21% of the total land area of Panay. It is composed of 16 municipalities and a city with a total of 472 barangays.
 
Political Subdivisions
The province is composed of 16 municipalities comprising 473 barangays. It is divided into two political districts: 1st District covers the municipalities of Maayon, Panay, Panitan, Pilar, Pontevedra, Pres. Roxas, and Roxas City; while the 2nd District covers the municipalities of Cuartero, Dao, Dumalag, Dumarao, Ivisan, Jamindan, Sapi-an, Mambusao, Sigma, and Tapaz.
 
Population
As of the year 2000 survey, Capiz has a population of 654,156.
 
Language
Hiligaynon is the dominant dialect spoken in the province.
 
Climate
The province has a 3rd type of climate, seasonal changes are not pronounced. Relatively dry from November to April and wet from May to October.
 
Industries
The even distribution of rainfall throughout the year and the infrequent occurrence of typhoons make the province highly suitable for agriculture, aquaculture, and other related activities – which explains why these are major industries of the province.

Farms for orchids, various ornamental plants, and different varieties of heliconia supply a thriving cut-flower business that is carving a market niche in Southern Philippine provinces. The land has also proven to be good grazing ground for cattle and for raising swine, goats, and poultry. Its long coastal areas abound with “kapis” shells, which are used in the manufacture of exportable novelty items. Numerous home and cottage industries amply augment household incomes, among which are poultry, livestock raising, handicraft, shell-craft, ceramics, lime processing, garments, farm-tool fabrication, furniture and boat making.

Back
Copyright © 2009 All rights reserved.
Best viewed using Internet Explorer 7 and Mozilla Version 3